IT'S HARD TO ADMIT WHEN WE'RE WRONG – HARMONICA LEARNING TIPS AND THOUGHTS

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It's hard to admit when we're wrong – harmonica learning tips and thoughts

Welcome to my harmonica blog! Today, I want to share with you some tips on a less talked topic, "It is hard to admit when we're wrong." My name is Luciano, and this is my harmonica teacher's diary. Yes, I'm a teacher but, most of my lifetime, I've also been a student to gain knowledge about musical instruments, languages, and many more things that I'd always yearned to learn during my past 46 years.

Have you ever been in a situation when you start feeling like you've been wrong all the way, but you won't just accept it, to avoid having wasted time or find it hard to believe that, when YOU were wrong, someone else was on the right path throughout? Or even worse if you've discussed it with someone in support of your ideas? Yeah, I guess this is something that may happen to any of us, and it is tough to cope with.

The scenario I' ve just depicted is what I see some of my new students entrapped into; I would talk about the situation when we' ve started studying something: in our case, the harmonica.

It may take you months or even years finding the right course online; via a Youtube video: the holy grail that may trigger your mind, or it may be that super calming conversation with any Facebook buddy. After quite many signs which will leave you suspect that perhaps the right track you're looking for could have been another, is where the trap comes in. It's not easy to admit or realize even or at least accept the set back you suffered because we all develop a tendency to justify and support our instincts, or primary choices we make in our mind – which is reasonably human. This is very much linked with the character itself and to the fact that we somehow we bind ourselves to the things and behaviors which we've previously executed. Some people, more than any other, find it difficult to abandon wrong things regardless of whether they are objects, particular affiliations, or even thoughts and convictions. After all, our ideas are what make us, and we do care about them!

My suggestion is: know that you can change your mind at your own will and you're free to discover new paths. It's your right to abandon what isn't in your favor; hence, take the chance to let new varieties take place, and be proud when you whoop with joy, "yes, I was wrong, but now I'm going to fix it and learn." 

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